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Mills and Bang

Only one publisher has ever dared to combine romantic fiction (for women) and military history (for men) in the same novels, and that is Moreover’s paperback offshoot, Mills and Bang. Yes, Mills and Bang brings together the fluttering heart and bazooka bombardment as no printing house ever has – and the sales figures show that people want it!
Today Mills and Bang proudly presents another selection of new titles. Whether you are a man or a ms, these books are for you.

red heart

A Sporran for Shirley
A Sporran for Shirley by Alison Lurid
Sergeant McWhistler of the Black Watch had seen many things in his life. He had seen mobs in Aden, riots in Belfast and closing time in Perth. But he had never seen anything quite like Private Dundas’s knees.
            ‘Have you seen those two white things beneath Private Dundas’s kilt?’ he said to Captain Oliphant one day. ‘I hate to say this about anyone, but I’m thinking that Dundas shaves his knees. We don’t need men like that in the regiment.’
            ‘Private Dundas is a woman,’ said Captain Oliphant briskly.
            Three days later the Sergeant had recovered his breath sufficiently to say to the Captain: ’A woman?’
            ‘Oh, come on sergeant. You know the new laws; we have to take good men even if they are women. And Private Dundas is a good man, even if she is a woman.’
            ‘I will break her and mould her to my will,’ thought the sergeant to himself. ‘I will make her sorry she ever joined the Black Watch.’ In which he was very wrong, for Shirley Dundas was more than a match for the hairy sergeant, and the night he challenged her to an eightsome reel was one he would never forget.

red heart

Desert Chase,by Gemma Raven
Africa, 1942. General Whitgift had pursued Rommel across the desert for 1,200 miles. He was still hard behind him, as he had been six months before. One night his adjutant came to see him.
            ‘General, you must stop chasing Rommel,’ he said. ‘All the men can see you are in love with him.’
            The General’s face went puce, purple, khaki, mottled and finally Harrods luggage colour.
            ‘That is the most infernal lie,’ he answered hoarsely. ‘I just want to ask him out for the evening.’
            But would he? Did he? The tension is terrific, and the details about skin care in the desert air are wonderfully authentic.

red heart

     Molly in the Malvinas by Thelma Webbing Molly in the Malvinas by Thelma Webbing
Molly Mandeville, harum-scarum veterinary surgeon attached to the Falkland garrison, had almost grown tired of sheep. She never thought such a thing would happen, to her. Then one day she looked up into the face of Major Trimfit. Heavens! His grizzled  moustached, his white eyebrows, the patient bags under his eyes…
            ‘Wow,’ she whispered, ‘but what a Southdown you’d make…’
            ‘Pardon?’ he said, puzzled.
            ‘Never mind,’ she thought. ‘I won’t mind counting sheep at night, if you’re one of them.’
            But she hadn’t reckoned with the jealousy of Captain Stanley Merino, who was in charge of the sheep-dog unit. The tension in the explosive trio built up until it was at boiling point – and then came sheep-dip day! Only one man could come back victorious. Which was it to be?

red heart

Pacific Patrol by Eunice Binnacle
Hugo knew that the strangest things happened at sea. But he wasn’t quite prepared to lift his eyes from the bridge of HMS Impermeable as they went round Cape Horn and see twelve dancing ladies tap their way across the foredeck in perfect formation, wearing billowing can-can costumes.
            ‘What the…?’ he said lamely.
            ‘They’re just rehearsing for the variety night in September,’ said the bosun.
            ‘But I ought to tell the captain!’
            ‘If you like,’ said the bosun. ’He’s third from the right, in the blue dress. He likes to be known as Roberta.’
            Suddenly Hugo knew that the voyage was not going to turn out quite as he had imagined. Little did he know that he would be involved in the strangest marriage ceremony in Santiago…

(Write up for our complete list. You won’t be disappointed.)

Moreover, The Times, July 1984